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Le Monde Du Vin

Food Pairing with Red Wines

Pinot Noir is known for being a crowd pleaser, because it goes with almost any dish possible. There is a broad range of red wines with the same characteristics as Pinot Noir.

All these wines have acidity, balance, fruit-forwardness, moderate tannins and compatibility with food. And the prices for these wines generally don't come near what you'd have to pay for a good Pinot Noir.

The first one is Sangiovese. It is very hard to grow and it’s a very thin skinned grape that ripens slowly. This slow growth helps it develop stunning aromas and textures. Sangiovese is one of the grapes used to make Chianti Classico. It is a very earthy wine, with bright cherry fruits.
Wines to try: Chianti Antinori
Pairs with: hearty meal dishes, Tapas, Herbal Pasta’s.

 While Malbec is Argentina's most famous grape, Bonarda (a variety originally brought over from Italy) is the country's second most widely planted. Bonardas resemble Pinot Noirs in structure, with very mellow tannins and even more robust fruitiness.
Wines to try: Chateau Malbec, Casillero Malbec,
Pairs with: Argentina produces amazing beef, like this tenderloin (with blue cheese and tangy tomatoes) and terrific reds, like fruity Bonarda.

Thanks to its cool climate, Austria produces lighter reds like Blaufränkisch and St. Laurent. Zweigelt, a cross between those grapes, has a lightness and focus similar to Pinot Noirs from Germany, along with its own lively pepperiness.
Wines to try:
Pairs with: Pairing red wine with vegetables can be a challenge, but reds from Austria, like Zweigelt, have a lightness that works with an herb-flecked spring vegetable stew.


While Malbec is Argentina's most famous grape, Bonarda (a variety originally brought over from Italy) is the country's second most widely planted. Bonardas resemble Pinot Noirs in structure, with very mellow tannins and even more robust fruitiness.
Wines to try: Chateau Malbec, Casillero Malbec,
Pairs with: Argentina produces amazing beef, like this tenderloin (with blue cheese and tangy tomatoes) and terrific reds, like fruity Bonarda.

Thanks to its cool climate, Austria produces lighter reds like Blaufränkisch and St. Laurent. Zweigelt, a cross between those grapes, has a lightness and focus similar to Pinot Noirs from Germany, along with its own lively pepperiness.

Wines to try:
Pairs with: Pairing red wine with vegetables can be a challenge, but reds from Austria, like Zweigelt, have a lightness that works with an herb-flecked spring vegetable stew.